Contract Review & Negotiation

contractualAwareness of contract terms and the negotiation of acceptable terms are absolutely vital to the maintenance of a successful business. I am able to quickly review contracts at minimal cost, in order to provide advice as to key terms and risks.

Whilst parties are often reluctant to raise contractual issues, and trust the relationships they have with the other party, it often transpires that personnel or circumstantial changes lead to the other party construing and applying the contract in a manner not anticipated at commencement.  It has been my experience that, far from viewing contractual queries as a negative attribute, many parties are comforted by the fact that obligations are being taken seriously.  Prior to contract signing I have rarely encountered a party who is not prepared to sensibly discuss problematic terms.

I am able to advise, draft revisions to documents and draft correspondence. I am also happy to assist with the negotiations themselves.

Some of the significant elements of a typical contract include:

  • Incorporated documents
  • Length/Term of agreement
  • Termination rights
  • Rates
  • Payment terms
  • Assumptions/Exclusions
  • Variations
  • Liquidated damages/Penalties
  • Fitness for purpose terms in design contracts

I have a good working knowledge of a number of standard forms of contract, such as NEC3, JCT, plus various partnering contracts, and can assist with the understanding of their practical effect and the specific issues relevant to them.

I am also able to draft contracts and other documents to suit any given situation.

Call: 07918 631548 or email: info@nelljones.co.uk

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